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Great Alaskan Explorer - Why not now?

Categories:

  • Cruises
  • USA and Canada
  • Western USA

Price:

From $3,799

Stay:

14 nights

Travel Dates:

Monday 3rd of June 2019 until Monday 17th of June 2019

Description:

Great Alaskan Explorer - Why not now? 14 Nights aboard Amsterdam - from $3799* per person.

SPECIAL DEAL

Special is valid to 28 Feb 19.
- 14 night cruise onboard Amsterdam 
- Main meals & entertainment onboard 
- Port charges & government fees 

BONUS: 
- FREE upgrade from an Interior stateroom to an Oceanview stateroom* 
- Receive up to 10% off select shore excursions* 
- Pay a reduced deposit of $220pp* 
- PLUS, book a suite & receive US$400 onboard credit per stateroom*

YOUR CRUISE IN DETAIL

14 Night Great Land Explorer Cruise sailing from Seattle roundtrip aboard Amsterdam.

The third Holland America Line vessel to bear the name Amsterdam, this elegant, mid-sized ship features a three-story atrium graced by a stunning astrolabe. While on board, enjoy America’s Test Kitchen cooking shows and hands-on workshops. Thrill to our exclusive BBC Earth Experiences presentations and activities. Rejuvenate at the Greenhouse Spa & Salon. Work out at our Fitness Center. And savor our delectable array of specialty restaurants.

Highlights of this cruise:

Seattle
Bounded by the Puget Sound to the west and Lake Washington to the east, and surrounded by forests and mountains, Seattle, Washington boasts a stunning location.But the largest city in the Pacific Northwest is as much an homage to human ingenuity as it is to natural beauty. From logging to shipbuilding to aircraft manufacturing to modern-day software and biotech development, the Emerald City has worn a succession of industrial hats, birthing the likes of Amazon and Starbucks—not to mention music legends Jimi Hendrix and Nirvana—along the way.Visitors are spoiled for choice of things to do in Seattle, with iconic attractions like the waterfront, Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass and Pike Place Market all easily accessible. "Local" and "sustainable" are words to live by in Seattle, an ethos reflected in the profusion of fresh-seafood restaurants, independent coffee roasters and quirky boutiques that are dotted around the city, awaiting a taste or visit between sightseeing. 

Ketchikan
Alaska’s “First City” of Ketchikan is so named because it’s the first major landfall for most cruisers as they enter the picturesque fjords of the Inside Passage, where the town clings to the banks of the Tongass Narrows, flanked by green forests nurtured by abundant rain.Ketchikan has long been an important hub of the salmon-fishing and –packing industries—visitors can try their luck on a sportfishing excursion or simply savor the fresh seafood at one of the local restaurants. It is also one of the best spots along the Inside Passage to explore the rich cultural sights of Native Alaskan nations like the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian. You can see intricately carved totem poles at the Totem Heritage Center and Totem Bight State Park, while the attractions of Saxman Village just outside of Ketchikan offers the chance to see Tlingit culture in action, with working carvers and a dance show in the clan house. And leave time to explore the sights in the town itself, including historic Creek Street, a boardwalk built over the Ketchikan Creek, where you can shop for souvenirs, smoked salmon and local art, while exploring gold rush­–era tourist attractions like Dolly’s House Museum. 

Juneau
Juneau, Alaska may well be the most remote, most beautiful and strangest state capital in the United States. Surrounded by water, forest and mountain sights, visitors seeking things to do in Juneau indoors and outdoors can hike a glacier, eat fresh-caught fish on a seaside patio and tour a grand capitol building all in one day.The city itself is pleasant, but the real highlight of a visit to Juneau is tracking down some wildlife. You can hike up Mount Roberts to chance upon wild deer and bald eagles. Most sightseeing and whale-watching tours head north to Auke Bay—bring a good pair of binoculars to get the best view of these majestic and surprisingly graceful creatures. If you prefer land mammals, catch a floatplane to a nearby wildlife reserve such as Chichagof or Admiralty Island to spy some bears lolling around.The sleepy, misty city of around 32,000—mostly fishermen and small-business owners—has a frontier town vibe, but welcomes more than a million visitors each summer to its natural attractions, cementing Juneau as Alaska’s number-one tourist destination.  

Anchorage, Alaska, US
After long and dark winters, Alaskans love their summers and the residents of Anchorage, Alaska are no exception. The city plants thousands of flowers to celebrate the arrival of warmer months and days that last as long as 19 hours from dawn to dusk. 

Approximately 40 percent of Alaska’s population lives in Anchorage. This diverse city of 300,000 includes a large military population, Native Alaskans, individuals who work for the oil industry and adventure-seeking types who want to get away from “the Lower 48.” Much like Seattle, Anchorage is a place where you can find a coffee shop (or espresso shack) anywhere. Locals enjoy skijoring, a winter sport where a person is pulled on skis by one or more dogs or sometimes a horse. While some cities have deer, Anchorage has lots of moose, known for being a bit rambunctious (and should be steered clear of if seen wandering down a street).

Anchorage is a city where you can see the northern lights—the aurora borealis—on a clear dark night, typically during colder months. There are also plenty of active things to do and attractions to hike, bike and see wildlife such as the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail or Flattop Mountain Trail inside Chugach State Park.

Homer, Alaska, US
This plucky little town sells End of the Road certificates to visitors who’ve motored here to the furthest reach of the Kenai Peninsula. It’s something worth celebrating: a drive down the world’s longest street that protrudes into the ocean! But walkers, bikers and in-line skaters can also experience the thrill, thanks to a 6.5-kilometer-long (four-mile-long) paved multiuse trail.

The rich fishing grounds here attracted Native Alaskans centuries before Captain James Cook claimed the Kenai Peninsula for Britain in 1778. After some Russian tyranny—fur traders forced Native Alaskans to hunt sea-otter pelts for them—Homer got a proper start as an English-settled coal-mining town in the 1890s.

Today the area’s known as the Halibut Fishing Capital of the World, and it captivates audiences around the globe as the home of the Discovery Channel’s Kilcher family, made famous by Alaska: The Last Frontier. Homer’s port also anchors the F/V Time Bandit, which swashbuckled into TV viewers’ hearts via Deadliest Catch. Top Homer attractions include the Pratt Museum, the Alaska Islands and Ocean Visitor Center and hikes at Grewingk Glacier Lake.

Kodiak,Alaska, US
Kodiak is all about bears. And what bears! This unique subspecies named for the Kodiak Archipelago where they are found evolved in isolation for around 12,000 years and can reach heights of 3 meters, or 10 feet, when standing on their hind legs. One of the world’s largest carnivores, the bears have a diet that goes far beyond meat (they can sleep for up to eight months, then wake up ravenous to feast predominantly on grass, plants, berries and fish). About 3,500 live on this tiny island, meaning you have a great chance of seeing one, if not many, from May through October!Shrubs and bushes cover the rolling hills here, giving Kodiak its Emerald Isle nickname. It was once a prime native hunting ground for the Alutiit, but their population plummeted after Russian traders and fur trappers settled the area in the late 1700s. Bought by the United States in 1867, Kodiak grew into a commercial fishing center. Today both the island and the hardworking town that shares its name attract anglers, hunters, adventure travelers and nature photographers. Top highlights include the Baranov Museum, the Holy Resurrection Russian Orthodox Church and the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. 

Sitka ,Alaska, US
The ports of Alaska inspire visions of remote wilderness outposts, legendary gold-rush towns and Native Alaskan villages, all set amid lush forests and frigid, glacier-flanked waters. And while you’ll certainly find these things in and around Sitka, you’ll witness a unique slice of Alaskan history not found anywhere else. Russia controlled Alaska from the mid-1700s until the United States purchased it in 1867, and Sitka was settled as the capital of Russian America under the name New Archangel.Sailing into Sitka today, you’ll still see vestiges of Russia’s influence, including the unmistakable onion dome of St. Michael’s Cathedral and the Russian Bishop’s House, both National Historic Landmarks. Stop by the visitor center of the Sitka National Historical Park to peruse its interesting collections of Russian and Native Alaskan artifacts, and then join a ranger-led tour of the battlefield where Russia defeated the native Tlingit people.Sitka also boasts an abundance of epic natural scenery and wildlife. Take a walk up Castle Hill to enjoy an ideal vantage point across the water to the dormant volcano Mount Edgecumbe, and trips to the nearby Fortress of the Bear and the Alaska Raptor Center offer up-close encounters with some of Alaska’s most captivating creatures. 

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Of all the cities in Canada, Victoria may be the furthest from Great Britain, but it has the most British vibe. Between sipping afternoon tea, visiting flower gardens and castles and stopping in at pubs, one could easily forget about the Pacific Ocean lapping at the other side of Vancouver Island. The influence of the First Nations culture is also strong here in Victoria, with totem poles taking a front-and-center position on the Inner Harbour and in Beacon Hill Park. Extensive galleries are devoted to the history of the First People at the Royal British Columbia Museum, too, one of Victoria's top tourist attractions. Other waves of immigration besides that of the English are evident in the streets of Canada’s oldest Chinatown here, as well as on the menus of the city’s many restaurants, pizzerias and tavernas.

Seattle, Washington, US
Bounded by the Puget Sound to the west and Lake Washington to the east, and surrounded by forests and mountains, Seattle, Washington boasts a stunning location.

But the largest city in the Pacific Northwest is as much an homage to human ingenuity as it is to natural beauty. From logging to shipbuilding to aircraft manufacturing to modern-day software and biotech development, the Emerald City has worn a succession of industrial hats, birthing the likes of Amazon and Starbucks—not to mention music legends Jimi Hendrix and Nirvana—along the way.

Visitors are spoiled for choice of things to do in Seattle, with iconic attractions like the waterfront, Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass and Pike Place Market all easily accessible. "Local" and "sustainable" are words to live by in Seattle, an ethos reflected in the profusion of fresh-seafood restaurants, independent coffee roasters and quirky boutiques that are dotted around the city, awaiting a taste or visit between sightseeing.

Conditions: *Offer ends 28 Feb 2019, unless sold out prior. Fares are cruise only, per person in NZD, twin share, based on lead categories, inclusive of all taxes, fees & port expenses (which are subject to change). Gratuities are additional. Subject to availability at time of booking. Offers are per stateroom based on double occupancy, for 1st & 2nd guests sharing a stateroom & valid for new bookings only. Offers are applicable on select 2019 & 2020 departures. STATEROOM UPGRADES: are available in select stateroom categories & are subject to availability of the staterooms in the higher category. REDUCED DEPOSIT: is a reduction off the standard deposit amount with the remainder due on final payment of the booking. Bookings made on voyages requiring immediate final payment are not eligible for a reduced deposit. Final payment is due 75 days prior to departure. SHORE EXCURSION OFFER: applies only to select shore excursions on select sailings, purchased in advance of embarkation, prior to 28 February 2019. If a shore excursion is cancelled once on board, refund will be the amount paid. SUITE OFFER: Onboard spending money is offered in the following amounts: cruises 7-10 days receive US$200 per suite; cruises 11-14 days receive US$400 per suite & cruises 15+ days receive US$600 per suite. Onboard spending money is in USD per stateroom & is non-refundable, non-transferable, not for cash value, expires at the end of that cruise, & may not be used in the medical centre or casino. Travel agent service fees map apply. Further conditions apply. Whilst all information is correct at time of publication, offers are subject to change or withdrawal. Based on the exchange rate as at 13 Dec 2019. **Oceanview Stateroom has an obstructed view.

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