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Panama Canal Premium Cruise

Categories:

  • Cruises
  • Central America

Price:

From $4,019

Stay:

20 nights

Travel Dates:

Wednesday 18th of April 2018 until Tuesday 8th of May 2018

Description:

Panama Canal Premium Cruise - 20 Nights - from $4019* per person.

Special inclusions

20-Night accommodation aboard the elegant ms Eurodam
Superb dining with all meals included during your cruise
Additional Dining options; Pinnacle Grill (US$39 per person), Canaletto (US$15 per person)
Entertainment and activities while cruising
Kids Club for 3-17 years old
Choice of bars throughout the cruise
Cruise, port charges and government taxes

Cruise details

20 Night Cruise sailing from Ft Lauderdale to Seattle aboard Eurodam.

The ms Eurodam marks Holland America Line's new Signature-class ships. The ms Eurodam furthers the evolution of our sophisticated mid-sized ships with 11 passenger decks, a new topside Pan-Asian restaurant and lounge surrounded by panoramic views, an Explorer's Lounge bar, a new Italian restaurant adjacent to the Lido, elegant luxury jewelry boutique, new atrium bar area, an enhanced and reconfigured show lounge and a new photographic and imaging center. On the technical side, the ms Eurodam features the latest state-of-the-art navigation and safety systems. The ship is powered by six diesel generators and propelled by the latest Azipod® propulsion technology. 

Highlights of this cruise:

Ft Lauderdale
There is an abundance of things to see and do in the Ft. Lauderdale area: visit the newly redesigned Ft. Lauderdale Beach and cafes, stroll the historic Riverwalk, shop the luxurious stores on Las Olas Boulevard or venture to the Everglades for an intriguing air boat excursion.

Cartagena
Its official name is Cartagena de Indias—or "Cartagena of the Indies"—but call it Cartagena for short. The formal name hints at this Colombian city's colonial relationship with Spain; it was founded in 1533 and named after the mother country's Cartagena. Colombia declared independence in 1810, but there's plenty about its fifth-largest city that evokes old Spain, including the impressive fort of Castillo San Felipe de Barajas, and the wall that encloses the old town, one of the few intact structures of its kind in the Americas. Both were considered important enough to inscribe on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1984. They may be historical artifacts, but the fortress and wall aren't merely tourist attractions; they are central to daily life here. Take a stroll and you'll see couples sitting atop the wall, locked in passionate embraces; parents watching their children walk it like a balance beam; and friends chatting while enjoying the Caribbean breeze. Along with history, there's cultural and culinary intrigue here, too. This colorful city was a muse of the late Nobel Prize–winning writer Gabriel García Márquez, and is increasingly being recognized outside Colombia for its cuisine, which takes many cues from Caribbean ingredients. (Don't leave without trying the coconut rice.) 

Panama Canal via Cristobal
For nearly the entire delightful Caribbean cruise on the way to the Panama Canal, excitement builds for one of life's thrilling encounters — passage through one of engineering's major marvels of the 20th Century. The Western entrance of the canal appears in Colón, Panama's provincial capital and includes Latin America's largest port complex. Your ship calls on the port of Cristóbal, within the shopping paradise of the Duty-Free Zone. Enough said.

Panama Canal via Balboa
Spanish explorer Núñoz de Balboa made the difficult traverse across the Panamanian isthmus centuries before engineers and laborers built the canal — which is the preferred conveyance, especially when you can cruise the passage in utter comfort on an ideal extended vacation. As Balboa will be your exit point en route to the grand Pacific Ocean, assess your time on the canal and all the photographs taken, and say goodbye to the historic and eminently curious phenomenon you had the good fortune to explore.

Puerto Caldera
It's hard to throw a stick in Costa Rica and not have it hit a national park. The city of Puerto Caldera, on Costa Rica's Pacific coast, has a number of them within easy reach for cruise visitors. Just to the south, Carara is a mecca for birders, especially those chasing the scarlet macaw. Poas Volcano is inland, and rises to nearly 9,000 feet. See it before it blows again. Barra Honda contains a series of limestone caves. Palo Verde preserves one of the last tropical dry rainforests in Central America. Arenal has the most active volcano in the country. Tapanti contains species of orchids discovered only in 2009. Grab your hiking boots and a pair of binoculars. It's all a feast, wherever you go.

Corinto
No one was watching, but Nicaragua turned into a new and wild adventure tourism phenomenon, and there's still much left to discover there in addition to the premium local rum and strings of beckoning volcanic peaks. Look for Puerto Corinto, a small scenic town on the northwest coast for the real local flavor in a region bounded by great lakes to the south and Honduras to the north. Peaks of neighboring volcanoes, pristine beaches, fields of sugar cane, and lush mangrove forests combine to create an intoxicating experience for all senses. Stroll the Costa Azul for views of the bay and its islands. In nearby Chinandega, discover Mayan artifacts at the archeological museum. Or, explore the remains of León Viejo, buried under centuries of volcanic debris.

Puerto Quetzal
Modernity meets Maya in Puerto Quetzal. Mayan culture still prevails in parts of Guatemala and other Central American nations. Weavers spin their brilliantly colored stories on backstrap looms, while monolithic stone temples of Tikal stand in silent testament to ancient ritual and wisdom. Developments in recent decades transformed the town into a bustling shipping center that handles Panamax-sized vessels of cargo. Its proximity to the Panama Canal a few hundred miles to the north helps considerably. Cruise passengers especially benefit from the modern port conveniences in Puerto Quetzal. The facilities here make transfers to Mayan archaeological sites of interest much easier, including adventures into the interior.

Puerto Chiapas 
The southernmost port on Mexico’s Pacific coast, Puerto Chiapas is named for the state in which it is located. It is relatively new, built in 1975, and is the primary hub from which the region’s agricultural goods, including coffee, are sent abroad. For travelers arriving by cruise ship, the town of Puerto Chiapas is a jumping-off point to explore surrounding areas, including Tapachula, the second-largest city in the state of Chiapas. In addition to visiting the coffee estates and banana and cacao plantations of the area, day trips include excursions to Maya sites such as Izapa. Although not as well known as some of the Maya sites of southern and eastern Mexico, such as the UNESCO World Heritage Site Chichén Itzá, Izapa is impressive nonetheless. In addition to its interesting location—it sits along a river and is aligned with a volcano (the sixth-tallest mountain in Mexico)—archaeologists have found numerous stelae and evidence that it was the largest Maya site in Chiapas. While in the area, don’t miss the opportunity to sample the cuisine of Chiapas, which is influenced heavily by the Maya. One typical dish is tasajo, a thinly sliced beef steak marinated in a sauce made with achiote (also known as annatto) and chili. 

Huatulco
Everything you ever wanted in a seaside resort: warm sun, sandy beaches and nine beautiful bays rimmed in every shade of blue. Nearby: low-growth caducifolia jungles teeming with birdlife and the nesting grounds of endangered sea turtles. Sample shore excursions: Five Bays by Catamaran; Horseback Riding; Bird-watching Eco Tour; ATV Jungle Adventure.

Puerto Vallarta
Puerto Vallarta squeezed into the thin space between Banderas Bay and the verdant folds of the Sierra Madre. It's no longer the well-kept secret of the artists, writers and Hollywood stars who first "discovered" it in the 1960s, but "PV" (as it is affectionately known) still retains the essence of the fishing village it once was. Viejo Vallarta, the old town, is a mix of red-tiled buildings, cobbled streets, chic shops and busy open markets. Other highlights include Mismaloya Beach, Gringo Gulch, and Conchas Chinas, the Beverly Hills of Vallarta. Head inland for more adventure, up into the rugged canyons and luxuriant jungles of the mountains.

Cabo San Lucas
The timeless image of that natural archway spilling into the sea evokes all the right ingredients for vacation time: Maritime desert climates, beaches galore, crystal-blue surf, and big game fish along the southern coast of rugged Baja California. This ideal resort and entertainment hub thrives at the end of the road, literally where the long Mexican peninsula meets the surf. Find classic Mexico in San Jose del Cabo, the old town, and a resort-fringed coast nearly always slathered in sunshine. Cabo's divine shopping bargains can't be beat, and wear sunglasses on Lover's Beach (great views of that arch at Land's End), as well as on forays to Las Playitas — a series of mini-beaches tucked into weathered coves.

San Francisco
With cable cars that "climb halfway to the stars," this is everybody's favorite city by the bay. Alcatraz, Nob Hill, Lombard Street, Fisherman's Wharf of course you've heard of them all. Don't miss this chance to really experience San Francisco.

Vancouver, Canada
If you could watch the history of Vancouver as a time-lapse movie, you'd see the creation of a sawmill and a community that grew up around it, which then became the townsite of Granville. Then comes the railroad, and development of the great natural harbor. Then: a sudden linkage to the Orient, Eastern Canada, and Europe. Immigrants come, business blooms, and the skyscrapers rise up along Burrard Inlet, always with the mountains visible in the spaces between the buildings. Go for the galleries, boutiques, public markets, and restaurants of every flavor. Visit vibrant Chinatown and Stanley Park, with its 1,000 acres of forests, gardens, lakes and lawns in the heart of the city.

Seattle
Harvester of trees. Provisioner to gold rushers. Gateway for sea commerce. Incubator of jazz and grunge, jets and literature, coffee and computer software. Seattle is as much about reinvention as it is a landscape. But what a landscape! There are lakes and mountains and forests everywhere you look. The rest is an archipelago of neighborhoods studded with boutiques and coffee shops. Catch a salmon at Pike Place Market, ride to the top of the Space Needle, sample a local microbrew in Fremont, or slurp a bowl of steaming pho down in the International District.

Terms & Conditions : Cruise costs are in New Zealand Dollars (NZD). Offer subject to availability at time of booking. Prices are per person share twin based on best available cruise fare, inclusive of all discounts unless otherwise stated. Prices are subject to currency fluctuations and are based on cash or cheque. Itinerary changes may apply. Cruise deposit, amendment and cancellation conditions apply. Travel agent service fees may apply. Special conditions apply - please ask for full details at time of enquiry. Cruise Line reserves the right to re-instate the fuel supplement for all guests up to US$9 per person per day if the price of light sweet crude on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) exceeds US$70 per barrel. Please consult cruise line website for current information.

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