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Australia & NZ Explorer Holiday Cruise

Categories:

  • Cruises
  • New Zealand

Price:

From $4,249

Stay:

17 nights

Travel Dates:

Tuesday 19th of December 2017 until Friday 5th of January 2018

Description:

Australia and New Zealand Explorer Holiday Cruise from Auckland Return - 17 Nights - from $4249 per person (Share Twin).

Special inclusions

17-Night cruise and accommodation aboard ms Maasdam
All meals included during your cruise
Entertainment and activities while cruising
Port taxes and government fees

Bonus Offers include*:
- Prepaid Gratuities (hotel service charges)
- Up to US$500 onboard spending money 
- Book a Suite and receive US$100 internet credit!

Cruise details

17 Night Cruise sailing from Auckland roundtrip aboard Maasdam.

Named for the Maas River in the Netherlands, the ms Maasdam is the fifth ship in Holland America Line's 135-year history to bear the name. At 720-feet, the ms Maasdam is designed to carry fewer guests while providing more space for maximum comfort. Many staterooms feature commanding ocean views, and each suite has a private verandah.

Featuring an interior motif that pays homage to the historical Dutch East and West India companies of the 17th through 19th centuries, the centerpiece of this elegant ship features Luciano Vistosi's "Totem," a monumental sculpture using nearly 2,000 glimmering pieces of glass, prominently displayed in a soaring three-story atrium. Other intriguing art featured on the ms Maasdam are two abstract murals painted especially for the Rotterdam Dining Room and a collection of seven iron teapots and a charcoal brazier from Japan, which date from the end of Edo period.

Highlights of this cruise:

Auckland
What makes Auckland one of the loveliest and most livable South Pacific cities in the world? Credit the visually enticing and world renowned north island of New Zealand where this city sits. To the south, picture rugged and mountainous terrain laced with caves and mystery, while extinct volcanoes in this Ring of Fire nation now form perfect sites for parks with grassy hillsides. Get the best perspective on this City of Sails by climbing up one of these prospects with evocative names — Mount Eden, North Head, or One Tree Hill — and take in the views and fresh sea air. For life on the waterfront. Waitemata and Manukau Harbours provide excellent examples.

Sydney
Even for many Australians, Sydney poses a curious challenge to define accurately. The entire world arrives daily to tour the harbor and its stellar modern architectural icons like the famed Sydney Opera House. Yet, easily as noticeable, 50,000 years of Aboriginal history which unfolds in real time, helping forge the multicultural future of the world's largest island nation that has a knack for eye-catching imagery and particularly monolithic rock formations. The strands of culture, nature, democracy, and art create the mosaic for Sydney's brilliant yet rugged transcendence. Of course, it makes for exceptional cuisine and an influx of world class chefs making their mark on our appetites.

Melbourne
Melbourne is consistently voted one of the world's most livable cities—and for good reason. This is Australia’s cosmopolitan heart with cutting-edge art and architecture, historic galleries, attractions and museums, plus a dizzying range of restaurants, bistros, markets and bars. It's renowned for its sporting culture, home to the esteemed Melbourne Cricket Ground and Australian rules football teams.

The famous laneways of Melbourne bustle with hidden bars and eateries, while myriad beaches and parks allow for the ultimate outdoor lifestyle and active things to do. It’s a melting pot of cultures and a city of gourmands who demand excellent food and find it everywhere—from modern Australian cuisine and delicious Asian fusion fare to low-key cafés serving the best coffee you’ve ever tasted.If you want to leave the city, Melbourne is the gateway to Victoria's world-class wineries and spectacular coastline sights. Visit the famous penguins at nearby Phillip Island or feast on local produce in the picture-perfect Yarra Valley. Wherever you go in and around Melbourne, you’ll be sure to understand why so many choose to call this beautiful corner of the world home.

Burnie
Burnie’s long-running logging industry is just one hint at the amazing forests that surround the town, from the UNESCO World Heritage area that contains Tasmania’s most famous crag—Cradle Mountain—to the lesser-known rain forests of the Tarkine wilderness. Woodworkers, papermakers and print artists thrive in this misty land of trees, as does rare wildlife, ranging from wedge-tailed eagles to echidnas and the fabled Tasmanian devils. There’s pristine beachfront, too, where little penguins march and well-to-do locals dine on seafood platters as they gaze off into Bass Strait. Tasmania's separation from mainland Australia has created a resourceful, self-reliant and sometimes rebellious community that cooks and farms as well as it crafts and explores. Burnie's bounty includes award-winning single-malt whiskeys, hard apple cider, trout and salmon, hormone-free milk and cheeses and beef from Cape Grim in the far northwest. Known for having the world’s cleanest air, Burnie is an exciting base for a taste tour as well as a rugged or refined adventure.

Dunedin (Port Chalmers)
If you've ever been to Edinburgh, a cruise to Dunedin with Holland America Line may give you deja vu. The word “Dunedin” comes from the Scottish Gaelic name for Edinburgh, Dùn Èideann. Similarities to Scotland’s capital don’t end with the name, even though the two cities are as geographically distant from one another as they can be. Englishman Charles Kettle, the city’s original surveyor, gave instructions for builders to reproduce characteristics of the much-admired New Town precinct of Edinburgh. And a number of restaurants honor the city’s Scottish heritage, featuring items such as haggis, Cullen skink, and whiskey. 

Wellington
The Wellington Botanic Garden is 25 hectares of ponds, sculptures, and flora spread about a hillside above central Wellington. Walk its windy paths, stop to smell the rose gardens, and take in the view of the city and Wellington Harbour. When you're ready, ride the red Wellington Cable Car (a funicular, really) down to Lambton Quay, the city's main commercial street, and give the New Zealand capital a walking tour. Wellington has been called a lot of things, all good. And if the countryside looks familiar to cruise visitors, that's because many signature scenes from the "Lord of the Rings" movies were filmed nearby.

Terms & Conditions

Cruise costs are in New Zealand Dollars (NZD). Offer subject to availability at time of booking. Prices are per person share twin based on best available cruise fare, inclusive of all discounts unless otherwise stated. Prices are subject to currency fluctuations and are based on cash or cheque. Itinerary changes may apply. Cruise deposit, amendment and cancellation conditions apply. Travel agent service fees may apply. Special conditions apply - please ask for full details at time of enquiry. Cruise Line reserves the right to re-instate the fuel supplement for all guests up to US$9 per person per day if the price of light sweet crude on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) exceeds US$70 per barrel. Please consult cruise line website for current information.

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